Campus Units, Organizations, and Support Groups

FAQs on Sourcing Merchandise

How do I get approval to use the UCLA name or trademark(s) on our promotional merchandise?

  • Refer to the naming convention and graphic identity guidelines for Registered Campus OrganizationsRegistered Affiliated OrganizationsRecognized Support Groups, and UCLA Campus Units described below in this FAQ.
  • Select an authorized vendor to produce your merchandise
  • Complete the Request to Use UCLA Marks

What can delay the processing of my request?

  • Requesting to use vendors who are not licensed.
  • Submitting an incomplete Request to Use UCLA Marksform
  • Designs that include third-party names and logos require additional review by the Administrative Vice Chancellor. Be sure to correctly indicate use of third-party names/logos when completing the Request to Use UCLA Marks 

Registered Campus Organizations
:   What naming conventions and visual identity policies apply?

  • UCLA Policy 110 provides that Registered Campus Organizations may only use the UCLA name or other names (e.g. “Bruin” or “Bruins”) as part of their own name for the purpose of geographical designation. Example, “Undergraduate English Association at UCLA” is acceptable. “UCLA Undergraduate English Association” is not acceptable.  Such use of the UCLA name or other names may only appear in a plain text font.  Use of UCLA official logos or other non-plain text fonts is prohibited.

Examples:

      • “[Group Name]at UCLA” format:  e.g. Chess Club at UCLA
      • “Bruin [Group Name] at UCLA” format:  e.g. Bruin Democrats at UCLA
      • “Bruins [stated purpose/interest]” format: e.g. Bruins for Peace
  • For additional examples, visit the UCLA Brand website.

Registered Campus Organizations
:   What Additional Campus Resources and Policies are available?

  • Student Organizations, Leadership & Engagement (SOLE)

Registered Campus Organizations are encouraged to consult with their SOLE advisor for additional information concerning student group naming conventions and rules for using the UCLA name and trademarks.

  • Student Government Accounting

If your group will be using student government funds to purchase licensed merchandise you will need to complete the Student Government Accounting (SGA) requisition process to access these funds. Resources are available here.

  • UCLA Policy No. 110

UCLA Policy 110 governs all uses of the UCLA name and trademarks and identifies the designated authorities with regard to different types of uses.

  • Follow UCLA Brand Guidelines

UCLA Brand Guidelines

  • Third-party names together with the UCLA name/logo

In accordance with UCLA Policy 110, designs that include third-party names and logos require additional review by the Administrative Vice Chancellor.  Be sure to correctly indicate use of third-party names/logos when completing the Request to Use UCLA Marks form.

UCLA Campus Departments and Programs
:  is  permission to use the UCLA name & trademark on merchandise required?

Yes. Key policies that apply to ensure your department’s UCLA merchandise request can be approved include:

  • Use Licensed Vendors

Placement of the UCLA name and related names and trademarks on any consumer goods, whether such merchandise will be used for internal purposes by the campus department or distributed to others, may only be performed by vendors who are licensed by the Regents of the University of California through agreements managed by ASUCLA. This requirement applies universally including to all UCLA campus departments and programs. Read more on why use of licensed vendors is required.

  • UCLA Policy No. 110

UCLA Policy 110 governs all uses of the UCLA name and trademarks and identifies the designated authorities with regard to different types of uses.

  • Follow UCLA Brand Guidelines

UCLA Brand Guidelines.

  • Third-party names together with the UCLA name/logo:

In accordance with UCLA Policy 110, designs that include third-party names and logos require additional review by the Administrative Vice Chancellor.  Be sure to correctly indicate use of third-party names/logos when completing the Request to Use UCLA Marks form

Why can’t we use another vendor that isn’t on the list of licensed vendors?

  • The University of California’s Trademark Licensing Code of Conduct (UC Code)requires that all goods bearing the UCLA name and all related trademarks regardless of end-use– including retail and promotional items, gifts, uniforms, or other uses – must be produced or otherwise sourced only through companies authorized, by virtue of a licensing or other agreement, to place UC trademarks onto products (e.g. apparel, school supplies, toys, and promotional goods). The UC Code emphasizes that it is the responsibility of all UC employees and students ordering goods bearing UC’s name, logos or other UC-owned trademarks (including names of University departments) to use only authorized licensees that have expressly agreed to adhere to the UC Code
  • Read more on why use of licensed vendors is required.

Where can we find a list of UCLA licensed vendors or other authorized sources?

You can find a list here

How does UCLA Trademarks & Licensing determine which companies to license?

We value, appreciate, and respect each company that applies for a UCLA license. Not every company that applies for a UCLA license is granted one, but we endeavor to provide constructive feedback to all applicants.

Read more about expectations for companies who hold or wish to hold a UCLA license.

Can we sell our merchandise?

Under rare circumstances your group may be permitted to sell your merchandise on campus subject to university policy. However, selling merchandise will impact its royalty status. Contact Trademarks & Licensing for further information.

Can we use a third-party sponsor name or logo along with the UCLA name or trademark on our merchandise?

In accordance with UCLA Policy 110, permission from the Administrative Vice Chancellor (AVC) is required for any use of the UCLA name and related names and logo together with any third-party, non-UCLA entity name or logo. This includes all marketing materials, websites and other collateral.

Be sure to correctly indicate use of third-party names/logos when completing the Request to Use UCLA Marks form

Third party sponsor designation

If the use of a third-party sponsor name in association with the UCLA name is authorized by the Administrative Vice Chancellor, note that the appearance of the sponsor names/logo on any products bearing the UCLA name must be accompanied by qualifying language designating the sponsor as such. For example: “Acme Anvil Company, Proud Sponsor of UCLA Health Systems”.

The vendor we want to buy from is not licensed; can they be granted a license so we can do business with them?

Unless the product you’re looking for is unique and not available from existing UCLA licensee options, please use a company from the list of approved resources.

The vetting process to license a new vendor is extremely rigorous, and resource-intensive for both the applicant and UCLA.  If a vendor does want to apply for a license, they should start by reviewing the “Apply for a License” page of this website. The process can take three to six months—and there is no guarantee an application will be approved.

How much lead-time should I allow to get my merchandise?

When developing ideas for marketing campaigns and events, remember that products take time to design, be produced, and make their way to you. Ask your selected  vendor  from the approved resources list to quote the lead-time and all deadlines for placing your orders. The answer to how much lead-time to allow varies from product to product.

Your actions can have  impact, positively or negatively, the supply chain used to manufacture the products you order and the ability of the UCLA licensee to achieve compliance with the expectations of the  UC Code.  Rush orders and change orders have documented, negative ramifications upstream in the supply chain including things like forced overtime for workers. Retailers, as well as campus departments and groups, are  part of the supply chain and have a responsibility to undertake responsible purchasing practices. To ensure that your actions do not negatively impact that supply chain, please plan ahead and respect the deadlines that UCLA licensees provide.

FAQs on UCLA Trademarks

What is a trademark?

Trademarks identify and distinguish the goods and/or services of one organization from those of another. Trademarks can be words, symbols, or designs, three-dimensional objects (as in packaging), colors, landmarks, sounds, or smells. A service mark is the same as a trademark except that it applies to a service rather than a product. Because registered trademarks and service marks are valuable assets, they must be used correctly to avoid dilution in the marketplace and vulnerability to potential cancelation.

What are the University’s trademarks?

UCLA trademarks include all UCLA campus names, UCLA department names (including abbreviations of these names) seals, logos, trademarks, service marks, and any other words, symbols, designs, three dimensional objects, colors, landmark, sound or smells used by UCLA, whether registered or unregistered, that identify and distinguish its goods and/or services from those of another (collectively, “UCLA Marks”).

Examples of UCLA Marks include, but are not limited to, “UCLA” word mark and logos, “UCLA Bruins” word mark and logos, “University of California Los Angeles” word mark, the UCLA Seal design, and Bruin mascot logos, and “Bruins” and “Bruin” word marks in certain jurisdictions and formats. Use of any UCLA Marks for any non-editorial purpose- whether or not such use is in the form of the University’s official logos and fonts or is depicted in alternative fonts or designs- requires UCLA’s permission via its designated authorities. See Policy 110 to review permissions required from the designated authorities for various types of uses of the UCLA Marks.

Are “Bruin” and “Bruins” trademarks of the University too?

Yes. When these words are used for the purpose of referring to UCLA this constitutes trademark use that requires approval from the University.

FAQs on Royalty/Cost Recovery

Is royalty included in the price paid by student groups / campus units /organizations to UCLA licensees for use of the university’s name on products?

Yes.  As part of their license agreement, all UCLA licensees pay a percentage of the wholesale price on all products they sell bearing the UCLA name and trademark. This percentage is paid to ASUCLA in the form of royalties. This is true whether the products are intended for internal use by campus departments and groups or for their promotional purposes such as giveaways to donors, fans, and visitors.

How does ASUCLA use royalties?

  • Cost Recovery: UCLA Trademark/Service Mark Portfolio Growth and Maintenance

Since founding the UCLA Trademarks & Licensing program in 1973, ASUCLA has led in managing the legal protection and defense of the UCLA name and trademark around the world.  This includes efforts to protect and secure the UCLA name and related marks in connection with the university’s primary service offerings of educations, artistic and sporting activities, healthcare and medical services, and scientific research.  As a university of world renown, the UCLA name is vulnerable to attack from interested third parties in jurisdictions well beyond the laws of the United States.  Royalties generated from internal campus department and group uses do not generate net income for ASUCLA rather they help ASUCLA recover a portion of the costs incurred in its stewardship of growing and maintaining the trademark and service mark portfolio of one of the preeminent universities in the world.

  • Cost Recovery: UC Code of Conduct Implementation

The UC Code of conduct pertaining to fair labor practices in supply chains used to manufacture any goods (retail, giveaways, uniforms, etc.) is designated as the responsibility of every UC employee, student and other affiliates.  ASUCLA serves as the steward for the program and rigorously pursues implementation of credible efforts to measure and ensure continuous improvement in achieving these standards.  It is a shared responsibility of the entire UCLA community to support these efforts.

  • Student Services

Since establishing the UCLA Trademark & Licensing program in 1973, ASUCLA has reinvested royalties earned from UCLA licensed products to provide and enhance student services, to Revenue from royalty helps ASUCLA maintain for UCLA students the lowest student union fee in the UC system, and one of the lowest in the nation! These revenues fund capital investment in student-oriented buildings and services including lounges, meeting rooms, and event spaces and support official student government functions.